A Journal for Western Man

 

 

A Review of G. Stolyarov II's

 Eden against the Colossus

Sarah Brodsky

Issue XXXVII- July 7, 2005

Published on TRA's new site on July 5, 2006

See the Eden against the Colossus Home Page.

 

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Eden against the Colossus

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A Rational Cosmology

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Statement of Policy

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An individualís ideas mold the world, and Gennady Stolyarov II does just this in his novel, Eden against the Colossus. The novel is about a young scientist who discovers an alien species on a distant planet that is far different from anything on Earth. He observes the unusual and destructive nature of the creatures and brings about a conclusion worth reading for. However, there is certainly a deeper message to be found within the confines of Stolyarovís novel.

It is a novel of logical syllogisms which brings its readers to an Objectivist conclusion. It is a novel supporting not only an ideal but a way of life. The novel questions social and economic issues as well as the principles of manifest destiny. Eden against the Colossus seems to have the science fiction plot of Isaac Asimovís Foundation but the ideals of Ayn Randís philosophy of Objectivism. Mr. Stolyarov appropriately addresses the issues within the novel by bringing up both sides of his argument and confidently carrying them down to their foundations, thus showing the reader exactly what he intends to promote.

The novel is written in a very logical manner. It has a step-by-step feel to it, making the philosophical arguments presented within the novel very easy to follow. Each paragraph has purpose and a conclusion that leads to the next. There is no fluff and no nonsense. Stolyarov is very precise and straightforward with his words while at the same time giving his plot meat with an ongoing fight between two very different worlds. The novel keeps the reader thinking due to the fact that both sides of the argument are presented. The novel has the reader continually switch back and forth until one side finally rules the other out with logic.

Eden against the Colossus is a very honest book because it is not biased. This novel does not attempt to force any ideal in the readerís mind by giving only one side of the argument and enforcing it, but rather fairly gives each side a chance and then clearly shows the most logical side through the reasoning of the characters.

The novel addresses its authorís ideals through a futuristic world full of technologies only dreamed of by the individuals of our time. The novel brings about adventurous means of transportation, innovative research techniques, and vibrant descriptions of a world far superior to our own. The novel addresses social issues in the future through authoritarian figures and the roles of the government in society. The novel brings about an ideal society while at the same time showing the inevitable flaws others can create through promiscuous conservationists and environmentalists. Mr. Stolyarov shows his readers why a laissez-faire society is the most appropriate for the human race and why it is important to know one's full potential.

However, my feminist instincts did get the best of me when it came to the conversations between the main character of the novel, Aurelius Meltridge, and his wife Margaret. The only flaw I see in the novel is the fact that, in every single conversation between Meltridge and his wife, Meltridge is the individual who has all of the thoughts and all of the opinions. It seems to me as if Margaret just stands by his side and smiles at whatever her husband says. Although this is a minor issue, an individualist must recognize that even in a futuristic utopia the cult of true womanhood still darkly shines through.

Mr. Stolyarov has found the perfect means to his ideal. He has shown his readers why change is necessary in our society and what we can do to promote that change. This book is for sci-fi lovers, intellectuals, open minds, and mystery buffs. I highly recommend Eden against the Colossus to anyone who loves a carefully planed novel that keeps its readers thinking until the very end.

Sarah Brodsky is a connoisseur of literature and contributor to The Rational Argumentator.

Click here to return to TRA's Issue LXV Index.

Learn about Mr. Stolyarov's novel, Eden against the Colossus, here.

Read Mr. Stolyarov's new comprehensive treatise, A Rational Cosmology, explicating such terms as the universe, matter, space, time, sound, light, life, consciousness, and volition, at http://www.geocities.com/rational_argumentator/rc.html.

Visit PanAsianBiz for interesting perspectives on international business and current events in Russia and Asia. Dr. Bill Belew's blog especially addresses Asian countries' contributions to the emerging global economy. Dr. Belew also writes a blog on business in China - ZhongHuaRising - business in Japan - RisingSunofNihon - and business education - TheBizofKnowledge.

 

 

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