A Journal for Western Man

 

The Democratic Plan to Withdraw from Iraq:

Back to Civilian Micromanagement of the

 Military

G. Stolyarov II

(Originally Published on GrasstopsUSA.com)

Issue XCVII- April 23, 2007

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Statement of Policy

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            Numerous left-wing opponents of the war in Iraq like to classify it as a second Vietnam, a thorough quagmire where many American lives are meaninglessly lost. This designation is ironic, because another Vietnam is precisely what Iraq might become if these opponents of the war have their way with it. A perfect case in point is the Democratic proposal currently before the House of Representatives to withdraw all U. S. troops from Iraq by mid-2008.

            The Democratic proposal establishes rigid timetables for American troop removal, irrespective of whether vital military objectives get accomplished before the deadlines arrive. Does this sound familiar? It does, if we look back to the restrictions placed on the American military during the Vietnam War.

            The United States military in Vietnam was the single most powerful armed force in the world—as it remains today. American troops benefited from superior training, technology, tactics, and intelligence. Whenever the Americans fought the Viet Minh and Viet Cong in full-fledged combat, the Communist forces were always thoroughly devastated. Even the Tet Offensive—mischaracterized by the left-wing media as a defeat—was an overwhelming American victory; the U.S. and its allies lost only 4,324 troops while killing over 45,000 North Vietnamese Communist troops. All Communist assaults on South Vietnamese settlements and bases were repelled—without exception. In short, the troops fought valiantly and effectively; their conduct in Vietnam cannot be faulted.

            What, then, went wrong? Simply put, the troops were not allowed to do their job. The Johnson government, attempting to confine a genuine war within the parameters of a “peacekeeping operation,” forbade invasions of North Vietnam and incursions into nearby Laos and Cambodia—whose territory the Viet Minh and Viet Cong used to infiltrate South Vietnam. Strict protocols—issued by civilian leaders out of political considerations—bound the hands of American generals, preventing them from using their awesome military superiority to swiftly and conclusively defeat Ho Chi Minh’s regime. In the meantime, the left-wing media gave the people a distorted image of American troops as sadistic torturers and mass murderers—resulting in even more public pressure to politically restrict the American military’s capacities.

            So the American troops were not allowed to decisively strike against the enemy, and the enemy continued to inflict thousands of casualties that could have been averted by a more devastating use of force against Ho Chi Minh’s regime. Finally, Vietnam truly did become a quagmire, as American troops were shot down in broad daylight and not allowed to retaliate against the true masterminds of the attacks. Troops were withdrawn before the enemy threat was eliminated, and Vietnam fell to Communist tyranny.

            Military realities have the peculiar tendency of not being amenable to political forms. Call it a war or a peacekeeping mission, but the fact remains: there are fanatical foes out there with the will and the resources to kill American troops, and American troops need the opportunity to defend their lives and achieve their objectives using the best methods they know. The Democrats in Congress can set all kinds of rigid timetables for withdrawal and pretend that they are solving the situation in Iraq. In fact, no timetable can kill a single terrorist or diminish by one iota the threat that Islamofascist savages level against the United States and the Western world. When faced with such brute, primeval force as the terrorists present, the only effective way to resist is through force. The American military knows how to resist with force better than anyone else in the world; why not just let the military fight the terrorists properly? Civilian micromanagement of the American fighting effort in Iraq will only shackle our troops’ ability to defend themselves and to truly secure peace in the region.

            We can only hope that President Bush will veto this disastrous proposal, as he has promised to do if it passes Congress. Any restriction of the military’s activities in Iraq to an artificial political timetable will only serve to make the Iraq War genuinely resemble the quagmire in Vietnam. If the Democrats have their way, the American troops will withdraw before the terrorists are eliminated, and we will witness images in Baghdad eerily reminiscent of the 1975 evacuation of Saigon.

G. Stolyarov II is a science fiction novelist, independent philosophical essayist, poet, amateur mathematician, composer, contributor to Enter Stage Right, Le Quebecois Libre,  Rebirth of Reason, and the Ludwig von Mises Institute, Senior Writer for The Liberal Institute, and Editor-in-Chief of The Rational Argumentator, a magazine championing the principles of reason, rights, and progress. Mr. Stolyarov also publishes his articles on Helium.com and Associated Content to assist the spread of rational ideas. His newest science fiction novel is Eden against the Colossus. His latest non-fiction treatise is A Rational Cosmology. Mr. Stolyarov can be contacted at gennadystolyarovii@yahoo.com.

This TRA feature has been edited in accordance with TRA’s Statement of Policy.

Click here to return to TRA's Issue XCVII Index.

Learn about Mr. Stolyarov's novel, Eden against the Colossus, here.

Read Mr. Stolyarov's new comprehensive treatise, A Rational Cosmology, explicating such terms as the universe, matter, space, time, sound, light, life, consciousness, and volition, at http://www.geocities.com/rational_argumentator/rc.html.